Travel Tip: has legalizing cannabis affected insurance rates?


News

COLORADO (KRDO) — Monday, KRDO covered a study done by the American Automobile Association that took a look at driving under the influence of alcohol and cannabis.

“In our survey, we did find that folks who choose to use both cannabis and alcohol tend to take more traffic risks than those who drink alcohol only this isn’t just about impairment, it’s a general proposition and as a function that it’s really just about risky behaviors,” said Skylar McKinley, Regional Director of Public Affairs for AAA Colorado.

Now, many are wondering whether or not legalizing cannabis had an impact on insurance rates in Colorado.

AAA initially projected that legalized recreational cannabis would cause insurance rates to increase, however, that’s not what they’ve seen.

“We thought initially when Colorado first legalized recreational cannabis that insurance rates would skyrocket — we haven’t seen that. Although, impaired driving do tend to drive rates, and Coloradans that have been here a while will tell you rates have really increased over the years,” said McKinley.

Still, AAA says driving under the influence of any substance is dangerous.

Cannabis / Cannabis in Colorado / State & Regional News / Video / VOSOTs



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Burg Steakhouse Customer Leaves $1,000 Tip at Gatlinburg Restaurant




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TikToker’s hilarious tip about the London Underground to American moving to city


London can be a minefield for anyone, even for the most seasoned veterans of the city.

For new people to the capital, particularly those from overseas, it can be even more difficult adapting to a new city and culture.

Thankfully, one TikToker has provided some hilarious tips for getting around London as efficiently as possible on the London Underground.

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Responding to an American users’ request for London hacks before she moves to the city, tiktokturrell provided some invaluable advice.

She started her segment with: “Ok love, grab a pen,” so you instantly know what you’re about to hear is extremely important.

tiktokturrell continued: “Number one, if you are swapping lines at Green Park station go towards the exit, do not follow the arrows, the arrows are wrong, ignore them, it will literally save you decades in travel time.”

And it seems many commenters agree.

One person replied: “90 per cent certain that the Green Park arrows were set up by one of the TfL blokes so they can have a laugh watching people ageing 20 years over CCTV.”

Another said: “THIS GREEN PARK TIP IS LITERALLY THE BEST TIP FOR LONDON LIVING EVER.”

High praise indeed, but the top-notch advice didn’t stop there.

tiktokturrell added: “Number two, if you see a group of men chanting ‘lads, lads, lads’, go in the other direction.”

And her third and final tip was to, “check out Gordon’s Wine Bar, you’re welcome.”

Needless to say, you don’t have to be brand new to the city to benefit from these crafty hacks.





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Blog: BBB Tip: Things to consider when planning a summer trip during a pandemic (7/15/20)


After several months of self-isolating due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, consumers may be dreaming about summer vacations or weekend getaways. Do your homework, book smart, and travel safe when it comes to flights and accommodations.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that families stay close to home, or at least within the U.S., for any summer travels. It continues to urge social distancing, as well as diligent handwashing and cleaning.

It’s critical to plan carefully and flexibly. While many states are slowly reopening for business and airlines are ramping back up, any change in the pandemic’s trajectory could result in new restrictions that could scuttle travel plans. Familiarize yourself with cancellation and refund policies and consider travel insurance that covers COVID-19-related cancellations.

Tips for traveling safely in the age of COVID-19:

  • Plan ahead to protect yourself. Never travel if you’re sick or have been exposed to COVID-19; the same goes for anyone within your group. Always take a face mask with you for public places. Pack your own food, water, plenty of medicine and hand sanitizer, in case the restaurant, gas station or convenience store can’t serve you due to occupancy limits, or there aren’t supplies available to you.
  • Enjoy the outdoors safely. Beaches and parks are fun outdoor places to go; keep a safe six foot distance from other people. When going to a pool, take off the mask only when going into the water.
  • Keep your vehicle clean. If renting a car, RV, or camper, carefully wipe down all surfaces, and continue to wash hands and avoid touching your face.
  • Know your destination’s restrictions. Check with state regulations for quarantine requirements. Some states are still requiring visitors to isolate for 14 days when visiting the state or coming back from going out of town. Sign up for updates for any changes in policies at the location where you intend to travel. Many states are slowly re-opening for business, but that may change between the time the trip is booked and the time of departure.
  • Fly smart. If planning to travel by air, carefully review cancellation policies, consider travel insurance, and make sure to clearly understand the restrictions. As the departure date gets closer, check to see how full the flight is getting to determine if you’re comfortable being less than six feet from someone.
  • Be patient with the new normal. Be prepared for delays that occur when you are planning to travel because of the coronavirus. Health screenings and deeper cleaning procedures may add time to your trip.
  • Exercise normal travel precautions. Leave an emergency contact number for a close family member or friend. Avoid posting on social media about where you’re going or when you’re leaving. Save the fun pictures for when you get back.
  • Book through a reliable travel agent, travel site or directly with the hotel or carrier (airline, train or bus company, etc.). Better Business Bureau (BBB) received more than 5,700 complaints in 2019 concerning travel agencies and services. Check out any company’s BBB Business Profile at bbb.org or find a BBB Accredited Business, which must adhere to BBB’s Standards for Trust requiring that they advertise honestly, be transparent, and honor promises.
  • Beware of travel scams. Consumers should be wary of travel deals that seem too good to be true. Many online sites offer bargains on travel. Some are legitimate, while others may be scams. Verify the reputation of sites when booking travel by going to bbb.org, and check a site’s reservation policies and other fine print — including any COVID-19-related cancellation and refund policies — before booking deals.

For assistance or to obtain a BBB Business Profile, go to bbb.org or call 573-803-3190.



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Send a tip on a railway walk for the chance to win a prize worth £200 | Travel


Britain boasted one of the most far-reaching railway networks in Europe until the early 1960s, when the “Beeching Axe” cut thousands of miles of lines and stations to reduce the cost of upkeep. These abandoned tracks, cuttings and viaducts now provide a corridor for nature and some great walking – more than 4,000 miles of former railway line are open to walkers and cyclists – such as the Cuckoo Trail in East Sussex, the Strawberry Line in Somerset and the Monsal Trail in Derbyshire. We’d like to hear about your favourite railway ramble.

If you have a relevant photo, do send it in – but it’s your words that will be judged for the competition.

Keep your tip to about 100 words

The best tip of the week, chosen by Tom Hall of Lonely Planet, will win a £200 voucher to stay at a Sawday’s property – the company has more than 3,000 in the UK and Europe. The best tips will appear on the Guardian Travel website, and maybe in the paper, too.

We’re sorry, but for legal reasons you must be a UK resident to enter this competition.

The competition closes on 27 April at 9am BST

Have a look at our past winners and other tips

If you’re having trouble using the form, click here. Read terms of service here.



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Send a tip on a railway walk for the chance to win a prize worth £200 | Travel


Britain boasted one of the most far-reaching railway networks in Europe until the early 1960s, when the “Beeching Axe” cut thousands of miles of lines and stations to reduce the cost of upkeep. These abandoned tracks, cuttings and viaducts now provide a corridor for nature and some great walking – more than 4,000 miles of former railway line are open to walkers and cyclists – such as the Cuckoo Trail in East Sussex, the Strawberry Line in Somerset and the Monsal Trail in Derbyshire. We’d like to hear about your favourite railway ramble.

If you have a relevant photo, do send it in – but it’s your words that will be judged for the competition.

Keep your tip to about 100 words

The best tip of the week, chosen by Tom Hall of Lonely Planet, will win a £200 voucher to stay at a Sawday’s property – the company has more than 3,000 in the UK and Europe. The best tips will appear on the Guardian Travel website, and maybe in the paper, too.

We’re sorry, but for legal reasons you must be a UK resident to enter this competition.

The competition closes on 27 April at 9am BST

Have a look at our past winners and other tips

If you’re having trouble using the form, click here. Read terms of service here.



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Collapsed rubbish tip deal ‘mess’ sparks Dudley blame game


Dudley residents are no longer allowed to use Wolverhampton Council’s waste recycling centre in Anchor Lane, near Coseley
Dudley residents are no longer allowed to use Wolverhampton Council’s waste recycling centre in Anchor Lane, near Coseley

For almost 20 years, people living in the north of the borough had been able to use the City of Wolverhampton Council’s waste recycling centre in Anchor Lane, near Coseley.

At a full council meeting on Monday (April 19), opposition Labour members accused the administration of mishandling the issue.

They also said the council had failed to find a provision leaving residents having to make 18-mile round trips to use the sole Dudley borough facility in Stourbridge.

Authority leader Patrick Harley and Karen Shakespeare, cabinet member for environment, said Wolverhampton had behaved “appallingly” and given them no time to negotiate a new deal.

When the announcement was made on April 1, Wolverhampton’s deputy chief executive Mark Taylor said they had asked Dudley Council to pay 32 per cent of the £1 million running costs of Anchor Lane.

The recycling centre in Anchor Lane

This meant Dudley would have to pay £333,000 a year for residents to continue using the site, instead of the £200,000 fee previously agreed.

Mr Taylor described it as a “fair and proportionate” share, adding they had been negotiating for 12 months before the deal collapsed.

At Monday’s meeting, Labour councillors including Qadar Zada, Eileen Taylor, Susan Ridney and Parmjit Sahota all grilled the leadership on the issue.

Upper Gornal and Woodsetton councillor Kieran Casey said: “No alternative local provision has been put in place for residents in the north other than having to fill their car up with waste and having to travel an hour’s round trip to Stourbridge, which to me is frankly unacceptable.

“Clearly no alternative provision was considered well in advance of any problems arising. This has been badly handled by the controlling group right from the start.

“When will this mess be cleared up for residents and will the leader get back around the table with Wolverhampton to sort this issue out?”

Councillor Dave Tyler said the borough Stourbridge site was costing the taxpayer £1 million per year to run.

Councillor Dave Tyler

He said: “So we have a tip in Coseley which costs taxpayers one third of the cost than the one we own ourselves which costs a million.

“Why on earth did you not think this was a good deal with Wolverhampton for Dudley taxpayers?”

Councillor Shakespeare refuted the claims the authorities had been negotiating a new deal for 12 months.

She said Wolverhampton had invited them to take part in a review of the service and carry out a survey to assess the needs of residents in the north of Dudley.

But she said they had to chase Wolverhampton for the results of the survey and meetings to discuss the hike in fees only took place in mid-February this year.

She added the arrangement had been in place since 2003 with the increased charge of £200,000 coming into effect in 2008.

Councillor Shakespeare said: “We explained our concerns about the costing they had put forward.

Councillor Karen Shakespeare

“They wanted an increase of all their fixed costs, regardless of our usage. Had they allowed us to discuss it, we could have negotiated a cost.

“Wolverhampton shut us down and that has had an impact on our residents in the north but I can reassure you we will continue to look for alternatives.”

She also said 23 per cent of waste taken to Anchor Lane ended up in Landfill – compared with seven per cent at Stourbridge – and this, along with the increased charge did not represent value for money.

Councillor Harley added: “They have behaved absolutely appallingly to a neighbouring local authority.

“No time at all to sit down and negotiate and ridiculous deadlines given which left our administration with no result but to walk away.”



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Dudley tip deal “mess” sparks blame game


A BLAME game erupted at this week’s full council meeting between Dudley councillors after a deal to allow some residents to use a Wolverhampton tip collapsed.

For almost 20 years, people living in the north of the borough had been able to use the City of Wolverhampton Council’s waste recycling centre in Anchor Lane, near Coseley.

But the arrangement abruptly came to an end earlier this month when the Conservative-led Dudley Council walked away in protest at a proposed 67 per cent hike in charges being applied by their city counterparts.

At a full council meeting on Monday (April 19), opposition Labour members accused the administration of mishandling the issue.

They also said the council had failed to find a provision leaving residents having to make 18-mile round trips to use the sole Dudley borough facility in Stourbridge.

Authority leader Councillor Patrick Harley and Councillor Karen Shakespeare, cabinet member for environment, said Wolverhampton had behaved “appallingly” and given them no time to negotiate a new deal.

When the announcement was made on April 1, Wolverhampton’s deputy chief executive Mark Taylor said they had asked Dudley Council to pay 32 per cent of the £1 million running costs of Anchor Lane.

This meant Dudley would have to pay £333,000 a year for residents to continue using the site, instead of the £200,000 fee previously agreed.

Mr Taylor described it as a “fair and proportionate” share, adding they had been negotiating for 12 months before the deal collapsed.

At Monday’s meeting, Labour councillors including Qadar Zada, Eileen Taylor, Susan Ridney and Parmjit Sahota all grilled the leadership on the issue.

Upper Gornal and Woodsetton councillor Kieran Casey said: “No alternative local provision has been put in place for residents in the north other than having to fill their car up with waste and having to travel an hour’s round trip to Stourbridge, which to me is frankly unacceptable.

“Clearly no alternative provision was considered well in advance of any problems arising. This has been badly handled by the controlling group right from the start.

“When will this mess be cleared up for residents and will the leader get back around the table with Wolverhampton to sort this issue out?”

Councillor Dave Taylor said the borough Stourbridge site was costing the taxpayer £1 million per year to run.

He said: “So we have a tip in Coseley which costs taxpayers one third of the cost than the one we own ourselves which costs a million.

“Why on earth did you not think this was a good deal with Wolverhampton for Dudley taxpayers?”

Councillor Shakespeare refuted the claims the authorities had been negotiating a new deal for 12 months.

She said Wolverhampton had invited them to take part in a review of the service and carry out a survey to assess the needs of residents in the north of Dudley.

But she said they had to chase Wolverhampton for the results of the survey and meetings to discuss the hike in fees only took place in mid-February this year.

She added the arrangement had been in place since 2003 with the increased charge of £200,000 coming into effect in 2008.

Councillor Shakespeare said: “We explained our concerns about the costing they had put forward.

“They wanted an increase of all their fixed costs, regardless of our usage. Had they allowed us to discuss it, we could have negotiated a cost.

“Wolverhampton shut us down and that has had an impact on our residents in the north but I can reassure you we will continue to look for alternatives.”

She also said 23 per cent of waste taken to Anchor Lane ended up in Landfill – compared with seven per cent at Stourbridge – and this, along with the increased charge did not represent value for money.

Councillor Harley added: “They have behaved absolutely appallingly to a neighbouring local authority.

“No time at all to sit down and negotiate and ridiculous deadlines given which left our administration with no result but to walk away.”





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‘Mess’ of collapsed rubbish tip deal sparks blame game in Dudley


A blame game erupted between councillors in Dudley after a deal to allow some residents to use a Wolverhampton tip collapsed.

For almost 20 years, people living in the north of the borough had been able to use the City of Wolverhampton Council’s waste recycling centre in Anchor Lane, near Coseley.

But the arrangement abruptly came to an end earlier this month when the Conservative-led Dudley Council walked away in protest at a proposed 67 per cent hike in charges being applied by their city counterparts.

At a full council meeting on Monday (April 19), opposition Labour members accused the administration of mishandling the issue.

They also said the council had failed to find a provision leaving residents having to make 18-mile round trips to use the sole Dudley borough facility in Stourbridge.

Authority leader Patrick Harley and Karen Shakespeare, cabinet member for environment, said Wolverhampton had behaved “appallingly” and given them no time to negotiate a new deal.

When the announcement was made on April 1, Wolverhampton’s deputy chief executive Mark Taylor said they had asked Dudley Council to pay 32 per cent of the £1 million running costs of Anchor Lane.

This meant Dudley would have to pay £333,000 a year for residents to continue using the site, instead of the £200,000 fee previously agreed.


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Mr Taylor described it as a “fair and proportionate” share, adding they had been negotiating for 12 months before the deal collapsed.

At Monday’s meeting, Labour councillors including Qadar Zada, Eileen Taylor, Susan Ridney and Parmjit Sahota all grilled the leadership on the issue.

Upper Gornal and Woodsetton councillor Kieran Casey said: “No alternative local provision has been put in place for residents in the north other than having to fill their car up with waste and having to travel an hour’s round trip to Stourbridge, which to me is frankly unacceptable.

“Clearly no alternative provision was considered well in advance of any problems arising. This has been badly handled by the controlling group right from the start.

“When will this mess be cleared up for residents and will the leader get back around the table with Wolverhampton to sort this issue out?”

Councillor Dave Taylor said the borough Stourbridge site was costing the taxpayer £1 million per year to run.

He said: “So we have a tip in Coseley which costs taxpayers one third of the cost than the one we own ourselves which costs a million.

“Why on earth did you not think this was a good deal with Wolverhampton for Dudley taxpayers?”



Cllr Dave Tyler.
Cllr Dave Tyler.

Councillor Shakespeare refuted the claims the authorities had been negotiating a new deal for 12 months.

She said Wolverhampton had invited them to take part in a review of the service and carry out a survey to assess the needs of residents in the north of Dudley.

But she said they had to chase Wolverhampton for the results of the survey and meetings to discuss the hike in fees only took place in mid-February this year. She added the arrangement had been in place since 2003 with the increased charge of £200,000 coming into effect in 2008.

Councillor Shakespeare said: “We explained our concerns about the costing they had put forward.

“They wanted an increase of all their fixed costs, regardless of our usage. Had they allowed us to discuss it, we could have negotiated a cost.

“Wolverhampton shut us down and that has had an impact on our residents in the north but I can reassure you we will continue to look for alternatives.”

She also said 23 per cent of waste taken to Anchor Lane ended up in Landfill – compared with seven per cent at Stourbridge – and this, along with the increased charge did not represent value for money.

Councillor Harley added: “They have behaved absolutely appallingly to a neighbouring local authority. No time at all to sit down and negotiate and ridiculous deadlines given which left our administration with no result but to walk away.”





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