Hotel industry leaders hoping for spike in summer travel – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather


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If you’ve set foot in side the Outrigger Resort in Waikiki, you’ll notice social distancing, touchless elements and plexiglass at check-in, and enhanced cleaning in rooms. Along with masks in common areas, Hawaii has been setting an example when it comes

Wednesday, May 5th 2021, 6:10 PM HST by Tom George





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Hawaii County extends post-travel testing – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather


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Hawaii County will continue its trans-Pacific post-arrival testing program at both the Hilo and Kona airports through May 10. Post-arrival tests will only be mandatory for travelers who are not fully vaccinated. Travelers who are able to produce proof of

Friday, April 30th 2021, 5:32 PM HST by Sunshine Kuhia Smith





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Travel to Hawaii during Covid-19: What you need to know before you go


If you’re planning to travel to Hawaii, here’s what you’ll need to know and expect if you want to visit during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The basics

Hawaii reopened to visitors from within the United States and a small number of countries in October, but visitors must provide evidence of a negative Covid-19 test result.

All air passengers entering the United States must now present a negative test result. See below for details on which test types are approved specifically for the state of Hawaii, including for Americans arriving from other states.

What’s on offer

Spectacular surfing, sandy beaches, traditional Pacific culture and rugged volcanoes — including the ongoing eruption of Kīlauea. You can get daily updates on volcanic activity from the US Geological Survey here.

Hawaii’s geographical position and proud history make it unlike anywhere else in the United States.

Who can go

Travelers from other US states, Canada, Japan and South Korea are allowed to bypass Hawaii’s mandatory 10-day quarantine on most islands by following strict pre-travel testing rules (see below).

As of April 17, travelers from Taiwan are also eligible to bypass quarantine through testing. Travelers from Taiwan are still subject to quarantine when they return home.

Beyond those countries, Hawaii is following CDC guidelines, meaning those who have been in Brazil, China, the European Schengen Area, Iran, Ireland, South Africa and the United Kingdom in the past 14 days will be denied entry. Travelers from India will be restricted from entering the United States starting May 4. Travelers from all other countries must undergo a 10-day quarantine. Check the Safe Travels Hawai’i site for details as the situation evolves.

All tourists must also complete a Safe Travels Hawaii form, and many will need to undergo a health screening on arrival.

Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines and Southwest Airlines have created preclearance programs allowing passengers on many flights to show their test results before departure and bypass the airport document screening process in Hawaii.

Japan Airlines also recently added a preclearance program, and All Nippon Airways is adding one soon, according to Hawaii officials.

Travelers on select flights on Delta Air Lines and United Airlines from Los Angeles (LAX) to Honolulu (HNL) can enroll and use CLEAR’s Health Pass to securely link their test results to their verified identity before traveling.

What are the restrictions?

Hawaii’s travel restrictions change often.

Currently, all travelers must either undergo a 10-day quarantine or — if traveling from a handful of countries (listed above) — avoid quarantine by presenting a negative test from a “trusted partner,” a list of which can be found on the Hawaii Covid-19 website.

For air travelers age 5 and over entering Hawaii from abroad, getting a test from one of Hawaii’s approved Trusted Testing Partners will be particularly important because some tests accepted under the US testing entry requirement that went into effect in January would not allow travelers to bypass Hawaii’s quarantine.

Travelers, including those arriving from the US mainland, must have a negative test result before departing on the last leg of their trip to Hawaii. Test results must be uploaded to the Safe Travels Hawaii site before your flight to the islands or printed out prior to departure with the hard copy ready to present upon arrival. Otherwise, you will incur the 10-day quarantine.

There is a mandatory contact tracing requirement for all travelers from both the mainland and inter-island to Maui. All travelers to Maui have to download the AlohaSafe Alert app or another exposure notification app on their mobile phones. If you don’t, you’ll have to go into a mandatory 10-day quarantine.

Starting May 4, trans-Pacific travelers who are eligible to bypass quarantine (those from the US, Canada, Japan and South Korea) flying direct into Kahului, Maui, will have to take an additional rapid Covid-19 test upon arrival. The test is free.

On April 5, Kauai rejoined the Safe Travels Hawaii program, dropping its island-specific testing and “resort bubble” requirements.

Registration with Safe Travels Hawaii as soon as flights are booked is mandatory for all travelers older than 18. The form will generate a unique QR code that must be scanned on arrival. Negative tests must be uploaded here, and a questionnaire must be completed 24 hours ahead of travel.

Fully vaccinated Hawaii residents traveling between counties may bypass pre-travel testing and quarantine starting May 11 with CDC proof of vaccination cards.

What’s the Covid situation?

With only about 33,850 cases and 483 deaths reported as of April 30, Hawaii has seen relatively low Covid numbers compared with other US states. Strict lockdown measures were put in place in March 2020 to ensure that the islands were not overwhelmed.

What can visitors expect?

Restrictions vary by island, although there is a statewide mask mandate — they must be worn whenever out in public.

Oahu has implemented a four-tier system of restrictions. It’s in Tier 3 until at least May 5. (Tier 4 is the least restrictive).

This means social gatherings of up to 10 people are allowed. Groups of 10 people are allowed in restaurants regardless of household or living unit. Groups are also limited to 10 people at beaches. Weddings organized by event planning professionals at outdoor venues are now allowed with a maximum of 100 people per event (including staff). Commercial recreational boating is allowed up to 50% capacity. Helicopter tours, plane tours and skydiving are allowed.

Maui, Molokai and Lanai — all in Maui County — allow for gatherings of up to five people. Beaches and Maui County Parks are open.

On Hawaii Island, outdoor gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted as long as masks are worn and social distancing rules followed. Indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people. Beaches are open.

Kauai is currently in Tier 4, meaning gatherings of 10 people are allowed indoors and 25 outdoors. Restaurants and bars are open but limited to 50% capacity indoors. Beaches are open.

Useful links

Covid-19 State of Hawaii portal

Hawaii Trusted Travel Partners

Safe Travels Program

HawaiiGuide.com

Hawaii Covid-19 Travel News and Headlines

Our recent coverage

What’s it like traveling to Hawaii during the pandemic? CNN’s Brekke Fletcher wrote about her experience here.

For vacation tips, have a look here. If you’re a closet beach hater, here are some ideas of what you can do. Or have a look at the cats of Lana’i, where 600 of them are living their best life.



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David Y. Ige | HAWAI‘I COVID-19 JOINT INFORMATION CENTER DAILY NEWS DIGEST April 23, 2021


HAWAI‘I COVID-19 JOINT INFORMATION CENTER DAILY NEWS DIGEST April 23, 2021

Posted on Apr 23, 2021 in COVID-19, Latest News, Newsroom

Department of Health:

https://health.hawaii.gov/coronavirusdisease2019/what-you-should-know/current-situation-in-hawaii/

94 New COVID-19 Cases and One Additional Death Reported

DOH reports 94 new cases of coronavirus today and the death of a Maui man, 40-49 yrs, who had been hospitalized, with underlying conditions.

This report includes cases up until Wednesday at 11:59 p.m. Full data is posted on the State COVID-19 dashboard and on the DOH Disease Outbreak & Control Division website daily: hawaiicovid19.com/dashboard.

Hawai‘i COVID-19 Counts as of 11:59 p.m. April 21, 2021

Island of Diagnosis New Cases Reported since

2/28/2020

(including new cases)

O‘ahu 74 24,398
Hawai‘i 4 2,664
Maui 11 3,305
Kaua‘i 0 205
Moloka‘i 1 37
Lānaʻi 0 111
HI residents diagnosed outside of HI 4 1,031
Total Cases 94 31,751++
Deaths    1 477

Hospitalizations as of 8:30 a.m., April 22, 2021: Hawai‘i-4, Maui-14, O‘ahu-24, Kaua‘i-0

++As a result of updated information, one case on O‘ahu was removed from the counts, and one case from Maui was recategorized to O‘ahu.

Department of Public Safety:

1 Positive WCCC Inmate Result

COVID-19 testing is continuously being conducted statewide at all facilities. The Women’s Community Correctional Center (WCCC) reports five (5) inmate test results. Of that number, one (1) was positive and four (4) were negative. In following the facility’s pandemic protocol, the inmate was a new admission and was already in an intake-related quarantine. The Department of Health was contacted and will conduct contact tracing. No other inmates have reported symptoms.

The Hawai‘i Community Correctional Center reports 36 negative inmate results and 18 negative staff test results. The Maui Community Correctional Center reports 17 negative inmate test results and 10 negative staff results. There were 15 negative inmate test results received for the O‘ahu Community Correctional Center and 11 negative inmate test results for the Halawa Correctional Facility. For more information on PSD’s planning and response efforts to COVID-19: http://dps.hawaii.gov/blog/2020/03/17/coronavirus-covid-19-information-and-resources/.

Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority:

21,313 Passengers Arrive on Thursday

Yesterday, a total of 21,313 people arrived in Hawai‘i from out of state. A total 14,912 people indicated they came to Hawai‘i for vacation. There were also 1,442 returning residents. The trans-Pacific passenger arrival data is derived from data provided by the Safe Travels digital system.

To view more: https://www.hawaiitourismauthority.org/covid-19-updates/trans-pacific-passenger-arrivals/

Helpful Resources

Trusted Testing and Travel Partners:

The state of Hawai‘i only accepts Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT) from a certified Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) lab test results from Trusted Testing and Travel Partners. For the full list of domestic trans-Pacific, inter-county, international and airline partners, or information on how to become a Trusted Testing Partner, go to:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel-partners/

Safe Travels Hawai‘i Program:
Program overview: https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/

FAQs: https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/faqs/ 

Email: [email protected]

Call Center Number: 1-800-GO-HAWAII

COVID-19 Vaccine Status in Hawai‘i and FAQs:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/vaccine/

Vaccine Call Center: 808-586-8332

COVID-19 Expanded Dashboard (Tables, Charts, and Visualizations):

https://hawaiicovid19.com/data-dashboard/

Safe Travels Digital Platform:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/data/

Kaua‘i County:
Kaua‘i COVID-19 webpage: https://www.kauai.gov/COVID-19
To report violators: https://www.kauai.gov/KPD-Online-Reporting

Vaccine Information: https://www.kauai.gov/vaccine

Maui County:
Maui County travel and COVID-19 information:
https://www.mauicounty.gov

To report violators: (808) 244-6400 or [email protected]

Hawai‘i County:
Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage:
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/pages/travel

Critical infrastructure and medical travel request: https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c 
To report violators: 808-935-3311

City & County of Honolulu:
Honolulu COVID-19 webpage: oneoahu.org

COVID-19 Vaccine Information:  http://www.oneoahu.org/vaccine

Hawai‘i COVID-19 Joint Information Center:

All media inquiries should be directed to the appropriate State department



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David Y. Ige | HAWAI‘I COVID-19 JOINT INFORMATION CENTER DAILY NEWS DIGEST April 22, 2021


HAWAI‘I COVID-19 JOINT INFORMATION CENTER DAILY NEWS DIGEST April 22, 2021

Posted on Apr 22, 2021 in COVID-19 News Releases, Latest News, Newsroom

Department of Health:

https://health.hawaii.gov/coronavirusdisease2019/what-you-should-know/current-situation-in-hawaii/

101 New COVID-19 Cases and Two New Deaths Reported

DOH reports 101 new cases of coronavirus today and the death of an O‘ahu man, 30-39 yrs, who had been hospitalized. It is not known whether he had underlying conditions. Additionally, the death of a Maui woman, 50-59 yrs., with underlying conditions and who had been in the hospital was reported.

This report includes cases up until Tuesday at 11:59 p.m. Full data is posted on the State COVID-19 dashboard and on the DOH Disease Outbreak & Control Division website daily: hawaiicovid19.com/dashboard.

Hawai‘i COVID-19 Counts as of 11:59 p.m. April 20, 2021

Island of Diagnosis New Cases Reported since

2/28/2020

(including new cases)

O‘ahu 76 24,325
Hawai‘i 9 2,660
Maui 9 3,294
Kaua‘i 2 205
Moloka‘i 0 36
Lānaʻi 0 111
HI residents diagnosed outside of HI 5 1,027
Total Cases 101 31,658++
Deaths    2 476

Hospitalizations as of 8:30 a.m., April 21, 2021: Hawai‘i-4, Maui-16, O‘ahu-20, Kaua‘i-0

++As a result of updated information, four cases on O‘ahu were removed from the counts.

Weekly Cluster Report Attached

Department of Public Safety:
Statewide Testing Continues

COVID-19 testing is continuously being conducted statewide at all facilities. There are no new positive results to report. The Maui Community Correctional Center reports 10 negative inmate test results and 34 negative staff results. The active positive inmate count remains unchanged at one (1). The O‘ahu Community Correctional Center reports 21 negative inmate test results. For more information on PSD’s planning and response efforts to COVID-19:

http://dps.hawaii.gov/blog/2020/03/17/coronavirus-covid-19-information-and-resources/.

Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority:

March Vacation Rental Performance

Today the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority released its monthly Vacation Rental Performance Report. In March 2021, the total monthly supply of statewide vacation rentals was 587,300 unit nights (-32.6%) and monthly demand was 365,700 unit nights (-34.4%). That resulted in an average monthly unit occupancy of 62.3 percent (-1.7 percentage points) for March, which was nearly 20 percent higher than the occupancy of Hawai‘i’s hotels (43.1%). The unit average daily rate (ADR) for vacation rental units statewide in March was $248 (+3.6%), which was less than the ADR for hotels ($285). To read the full report:https://www.hawaiitourismauthority.org/media/7126/hta-march-2021-hawaii-vacation-rental-performance-final.pdf

18,069 Passengers Arrive on Tuesday

Yesterday, a total of 18,069 people arrived in Hawai‘i from out of state. A total 12,044 people indicated they came to Hawai‘i for vacation. There were also 1,645 returning residents. The trans-Pacific passenger arrival data is derived from data provided by the Safe Travels digital system.

To view more: https://www.hawaiitourismauthority.org/covid-19-updates/trans-pacific-passenger-arrivals/

Helpful Resources

Trusted Testing and Travel Partners:

The state of Hawai‘i only accepts Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT) from a certified Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) lab test results from Trusted Testing and Travel Partners. For the full list of domestic trans-Pacific, inter-county, international and airline partners, or information on how to become a Trusted Testing Partner, go to:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel-partners/

Safe Travels Hawai‘i Program:
Program overview: https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/

FAQs: https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/faqs/ 

Email: [email protected]

Call Center Number: 1-800-GO-HAWAII

COVID-19 Vaccine Status in Hawai‘i and FAQs:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/vaccine/

Vaccine Call Center: 808-586-8332

COVID-19 Expanded Dashboard (Tables, Charts, and Visualizations):

https://hawaiicovid19.com/data-dashboard/

Safe Travels Digital Platform:

https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel/data/

Kaua‘i County:
Kaua‘i COVID-19 webpage: https://www.kauai.gov/COVID-19
To report violators: https://www.kauai.gov/KPD-Online-Reporting

Vaccine Information: https://www.kauai.gov/vaccine

Maui County:
Maui County travel and COVID-19 information:
https://www.mauicounty.gov

To report violators: (808) 244-6400 or [email protected]

Hawai‘i County:
Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage:
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/pages/travel

Critical infrastructure and medical travel request: https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c 
To report violators: 808-935-3311

City & County of Honolulu:
Honolulu COVID-19 webpage: oneoahu.org

COVID-19 Vaccine Information:  http://www.oneoahu.org/vaccine

Hawai‘i COVID-19 Joint Information Center:

All media inquiries should be directed to the appropriate State department



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Lee Cataluna: Finally, Hawaii Residents Can Travel, Too


On Tuesday, Gov. David Ige laid out his plan that will allow Hawaii residents who are fully vaccinated to travel interisland without having to provide a negative COVID-19 test or submit to a 10-day quarantine.

Of all the recent steps to move the state out of the suspended animation of a pandemic year and back into a semblance of normalcy, this one in particular resonates in Hawaii.

When schools started cautiously bringing students back to campus again, that was big for kids, parents and educators.

When bars and restaurants could start to serve customers again, it was a celebratory milestone for those who missed eating out and having drinks with friends.

What a relief it was when hair salons welcomed back clients, when outdoor sports restarted for kids, when Kirk Caldwell let people sit on the beach again!

But residents being able to travel from one island to another within the same state without hassle is more than a logistical freedom. After a year of sacrifice and playing it safe, it is a triumph.

People on Oahu have seen the videos of tourists storming Maui beaches, and have had thoughts like, “Wow, I can’t even go visit Grandpa in Makawao without having to jump through a bunch of hoops, but there they are with a squadron of beach chairs in Kapalua and having a drum circle, mask-less and rule-less on the Makena sand. Why am I the only one having to fight COVID by staying home and following rules?”

Ige’s new inter-county travel vaccination program will mean that fully vaccinated Hawaii residents over age 16, who got their shots in Hawaii, can jump on a plane between islands like the old days. Trans-Pacific passengers and those who got their shots in other state will have to wait until the program is expanded.

In this one program, local residents came first. It is a big step, but it is small in terms of addressing the problem, the burden, the terrible imbalance of tourism versus the people who live here. 

Scores of visitors along Waikiki Beach during COVID-19 pandemic and the return of tourism and visitors. April 11, 2021
Scores of visitors had returned to Waikiki Beach earlier this month. Cory Lum/Civil Beat

In speaking of his inter-county travel vaccination program earlier this week, Ige told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s “Spotlight” program that the overall goal for tourism going forward is “not having to just go for 10 million and 12 million and 15 million … It’s really about getting the best 8 or so million visitors who are willing to listen to our mandates, to respect our culture and our environment in a way that allows to get a win-win situation.” 

Um, nice idea, but will there be a screening process? Will potential tourists have to sit for interviews, pass a written exam, go through an audition? 

OK, everybody who is willing to stay in  resort-area hotels, eat at resort-area restaurants, tip well, wear fish-friendly sunscreen, and resist doing anything that will require a Fire Department air lift or lifeguard ocean rescue will advance to the next round, which will consist of a credit check and an analysis of spending habits to prove that you have the means and the behavioral history of dropping serious cash when you travel, and are not the type to just crash in some soggy $35 dollar a night spare futon and subsist on scrounged papayas and sandwiches from the food martYou will then undergo a psych evaluation that will assess your degree of rebellion versus your ability to follow the dang rules and vacation like a respectful, decent, law-abiding human being.

If you are not selected to be a tourist in Hawaii, we recommend you rebook your travel plans to Florida, where they have more acreage and can therefore handle more nonsense. If you are offered a vacation spot in Hawaii, know that locals will still resent you, lawmakers will overtax you, businesses will overcharge you, and everybody still has PTSD from the days of 10 million tourists a year, so if you get a funny look, don’t take it personally.

No. The chances of figuring out how to get the “right” kind of visitors are pretty slim. The visitor industry — from the big hotel chains to the lady down the street who rents out the spare bedroom in her house — will never actively work toward fewer visitors, fewer flights, shorter stays, curtailed activities. 

The pandemic represented a lost year for so many things. It caused a reset in people’s lives and in the way companies do business.

So many things will never be the same, and that’s good. But talking about changing tourism like it’s a matter of finding the “best” visitors is ridiculous. At the very least, now local residents who are fully vaccinated can fly between islands without having to go through requirements as though they’re coming from another state or another country.

And that is one step closer to the kind of consideration that is needed for residents to put up with all those millions of visitors.





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Hawaii to Begin Vaccine Passports for Travel Between Islands | Hawaii News


By CALEB JONES, Associated Press

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii officials will allow state residents who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus to skip pre-travel testing and quarantine requirements for flights between islands.

Hawaii becomes the second state in the nation after New York to implement a vaccination verification program, state officials said at a news conference Tuesday.

The plan does not change anyone’s ability to travel and avoid quarantine by testing, as is currently required for trans-Pacific and inter-island travel, but adds another option for Hawaii residents who are 14 days past their final vaccination shot. People must have received their shots in the state to be eligible for the exemption.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige said the state hopes to add the option for trans-Pacific travelers this summer, but wants to test the program among island residents first.

“Since the very beginning of this pandemic going back to March 7 of last year, Hawaii has had the best outcomes in the nation from the health perspective,” Ige said, noting that the state has had among the lowest infection and mortality rates in the nation.

The program will begin on May 11. At the onset, vaccination records will be checked manually by people at airports. Soon, travelers will be able to upload their verifications to a state website that is already being used for pre-travel testing.

Ige encouraged people to get vaccinated as everyone over 16 is now eligible across the state and the nation.

Lt. Gov. Josh Green said the islands have had about 2.7 million travelers come through the state’s “Safe Travels” program since its inception in October. The program requires travelers to get a negative COVID-19 test no more than 72 hours before the final leg of travel to Hawaii. Some islands have required additional testing upon arrival, and those rules will remain for anyone who is not fully vaccinated.

About 35% of Hawaii residents have received at least one dose of vaccine.

People opposed to using vaccinations to travel or gain access to certain businesses largely focus on privacy and security issues. Questions about how personal information will be stored and concerns about inequality have been raised.

The ACLU in an article published in March said it does not oppose the idea but has some concerns around inequality.

“A system that is exclusively digital, whether by design or as a practical matter, would be a nonstarter because it would increase inequality,” the article said. “Many people don’t have smartphones, including disproportionate numbers from some of our most vulnerable communities, such as people who are low-income, have disabilities, or are homeless, as well as more than 40 percent of people over age 65.”

Ige said that the program will allow people who only have physical paper records to participate in the program. He added that private companies that will get access to people’s records will be required to work with the Department of Health to maintain privacy and security of the data.

Several U.S. states, including Idaho, Arizona and Texas, have banned requiring proof of vaccination for access to certain activities. U.S. federal officials say there are no plans to make vaccine verifications broadly mandatory.

In the UK, the government is testing a system of “COVID-status certification” that would allow people seeking to travel or attend events to show they either have received a coronavirus vaccine, tested negative for the virus, or recently had COVID-19 and therefore have some immunity.

Some worry such passports will benefit people and countries with more access to vaccines. Many countries, especially the world’s poorest, have struggled to vaccinate people.

Half of all adults in the U.S. have received at least one COVID-19 vaccination shot, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Sunday.

But the head of the World Health Organization said there is a “shocking imbalance” in global vaccination rates. The organization’s Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreysus said that while one in four people in rich countries had received a vaccine, only one in 500 people in poorer countries had gotten a dose.

The new rules could help Hawaii’s economy as residents are once again able to travel to other islands without having to pay for testing.

“The timing is right,” said Big Island mayor Mitch Roth. “We are islands separated by miles of ocean, but connected by families, friends and a sense of community. This is really the time to do this.”

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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The 10 best hikes in Hawaii


Hikers will find that mile for mile, the tiny islands of Hawaii cannot be topped for heart-stopping vistas and soulful beauty. With its volcanoes and rain forests, spectacular cliffs and waterfalls, Hawaii offers mountains to climb, lava deserts to explore and, most importantly, awe-inspiring views. Here’s a look at some of the best hikes Hawaii has to offer.

Kaʻena Point Trail

Best hike for ocean views

5 miles roundtrip, 2 hours, easy to moderate

The Kaʻena Point hike (in Oʻahu) offers extraordinary views the entire way, with the ocean on one side and craggy cliffs on the other. You can do it in either direction, starting from either Keawaʻula Beach in the south – where you’ll find the last real restrooms and a small car park –  or at the trailhead at the end of Hwy 930 in the north. You’ll have to arrange a pick-up if you don’t want to do a 10-mile round-trip.

Driving between the two trailheads, via Ko Olina, Pearl City and Dillingham Airfield, is a whopping 51 miles.

As you start walking from the Kaʻena Point Trailhead, you’ll see traces of the original use of this trail: the railway that hauled sugarcane all the way from the North Shore to Honolulu, which is why the path is so level and easy to walk.

Look for tide pools, sea arches and blowholes that occasionally come to life on high surf days. In addition to native and migratory seabirds, you might spot Hawaiian monk seals laid out on the rocks or the sand – don’t disturb these endangered creatures.

At the halfway mark of the hike is Kaʻena Point, which has remarkable views out over the white-capped Pacific. Here at the westernmost point on Oʻahu, winter waves can reach 50 feet.

Assuming you’ve found an obliging person to give you a lift from the end of the trail, continue east to the north trailhead. Look for whales in winter navigating the rough, storm-tossed ocean. Many of these swells started in Alaska and beyond. At any time, you may see albatrosses overhead.

Tips for hiking the Kaʻena Point Trail: The trail is extremely exposed and lacks any shade, so take sunscreen and plenty of water and hike during the cooler parts of the day. Be cautious near the shoreline as there are strong currents, and rogue waves can reach extreme heights. At various places you may find that landslides have blocked parts of the trail; simply climb up and over to continue your journey.

Spotlight on: Hawaii’s volcanoes

Kuliʻouʻou Ridge Trail

Best hike for gorgeous summit views

4 miles roundtrip, 4 hours, moderate to difficult

West of Oʻahu, this route is open to both hikers and mountain bikers. The trail winds up forest switchbacks before making a stiff but ultimately satisfying 1800-foot climb along a ridgeline to a windy summit offering 360-degree views of Koko Head, Makapuʻu Point, the Windward Coast, Diamond Head and downtown Honolulu.

The trail is not always well maintained and may be partly overgrown with vegetation. Start from the Na Ala Hele trailhead sign at the end of Kalaʻau Place, which branches right off Kuliʻouʻou Rd, just over 1 mile north of the Kalanianaʻole Hwy (Hwy 72).

Polulu Valley on the Big Island of Hawaii
Polulu Valley (Polulu meaning “long spear”) looks as if it were carved out of the jungle and mountains by a vengeful deity © Milan van Weelden / Shutterstock

Pololu Valley Lookout & Trail

Best hike for lookout views

3 miles roundtrip, 2-4 hours, difficult

There’s a dramatic finality to the Pololu Valley, located on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. You get here and see a verdant, wild space. The entirety of the valley feels deeply primeval, and it’s easy appreciate why native Hawaiians considered the area rich in mana (cosmic energy). The word Pololu means “long spear,” and that’s a fitting appellation – the valley looks as if it were carved out of the jungle and mountains by a vengeful deity.

Even if you don’t want to walk this path to its conclusion, you should really attempt, at the very least, the start of this trail. The view into the valley from the Hwy 270 lookout is much improved if you are able to endure a couple of switchbacks.

The valley floor is about a third of a mile below the beginning of the trailhead. The floral fecundity of Pololu seems to shift into high gear as soon you hit the floor; the trees are lush on the way down, but they turn positively alien down here. You’ll need to cross the (shallow, sometimes dry) Pololu River where it flows into the sea to keep going.

Marvel at the beautiful beach and don’t venture into the water – the currents around here are particularly dangerous. From here you’ll walk on flat, verdant ground east into the valley; this short jaunt is about 0.40 miles long.

Keep your eyes peeled for a faint, upward climbing trail that wends for just over a mile through humid rainforest to the Honokane Nui Valley Lookout. The view is as lovely as you might expect: this is a showstopping lookout, located in a valley that is already incredible.

Group of hikers walking on cooled pahoehoe lava flow at sunrise, Kilauea Volcano, Big Island, Hawaii Islands, USA
Group of hikers walking on cooled pahoehoe lava flow at sunrise on Kilauea Volcano ©Sami Sarkis / Getty Images

Kilauea Iki

Best day hike

4.5 miles, 2-3 hours, moderate to difficult

If you can only do one day hike, make it this one, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Do the loop counterclockwise through an astounding microcosm of the park that descends through fairy-tale ohia forests to a mile-wide, still-steaming lava lake that was filled relatively recently by a fiery fountain spewing 403 million gallons of lava per second.

Kilauea Iki erupted for five weeks at the end of 1959, filling the crater with several meters of lava that washed against its walls like ocean waves and then drained back into the fissure. The lava fountain that formed the cinder pile above reached 1900 feet, the highest ever recorded in Hawaii.

This awesome sight turned terrifying when boulders blocked the passage like your thumb on a garden hose, sending a jet of lava shooting across the crater toward crowds of visitors.

To fully appreciate this hike, first watch the excellent vintage film, Eruption of Kilauea 1959–1960 at Kilauea Visitor Center or online, then grab an informative brochure ($2, or download it from the park’s website).

Tips for hiking Kilauea Iki: Hit the trail before 8am to beat the crowds. The faint footpath across the crater floor is marked by ahu (stone cairns) to aid navigation. Follow them; the crust can be thin elsewhere.

A hiker on the Sliding Sands Trail in Hawaii
Hiker on the Sliding Sands Trail in Haleakala National Park © Greg Elms / Lonely Planet

Keoneheʻeheʻe (Sliding Sands) Trail

17.8 miles round-trip; two days, difficult

The Sliding Sands path descends into an unearthly world of stark lava sights and ever-changing clouds. The trailhead is at the entrance to Maui’s Haleakalā Visitor Center parking lot, beside Pa Kaʻoao (White Hill). This hike is best done in two days, so secure a Paliku camping or cabin permit in advance.

The first thing you’ll notice? The silence. The only sound is the crunching of volcanic cinders beneath your feet. If you’re pressed for time, just descending 20 minutes will reward you with an into-the-crater experience and fabulous photo opportunities. The climb out, unfortunately, takes nearly twice as long.

The first six miles follow the southern wall, with great views. Vegetation is minimal, but you may see green kūpaoa plants and shimmering silverswords. At the first major overlook, after the long straightaway, you can see cinder cones dotting the bottom of the crater.

The views only improve from here. Switchbacks drop from the overlook. A spur trail to Ka Luʻu o ka Ōʻō cinder cone, which arises to your left about 2 miles down, has been closed. Enjoy the view from where you are. Next up? A field of silverswords. After that a narrow path squeezes through a tall lava formation, framing the peaks ahead.

Four miles down, after an elevation drop of 2500 feet, Keoneheʻeheʻe Trail intersects with a spur that leads north into the cinder desert, where it connects with the Halemauʻu Trail after 1.6 miles. Continuing on Keoneheʻeheʻe, head across the crater for two miles to Kapalaoa.

Verdant ridges rise on your right, giving way to ropy pahoehoe (smooth-flowing lava). Kapalaoa is reached after roughly four hours. From here to Paliku, the descent is gentle and the vegetation gradually increases. Paliku (6380 feet) is beneath a sheer cliff at the eastern end of the crater. In contrast to the crater’s barren western end, this area receives heavy rainfall, with ohia forests climbing the slopes.

After an overnight in Paliku cabin or the adjacent campground, retrace your steps to the visitor center.

Hikers on the Pipiwai Trail in Haleakala National Park in Hana, Hawaii
Hikers on the Pipiwai Trail in Haleakala National Park in Hana, Hawaii © Michael Gordon/Shutterstock

Pipiwai Trail

Best hike for adventure

4 miles round trip, 2 hours, moderate

Ready for an adventure? This super-fun trail ascends alongside the ʻOheʻo stream bed in Haleakalā National Park, rewarding hikers with picture-perfect views of waterfalls and an otherworldly trip through a bamboo grove. The trail starts on the mauka (inland) side of the visitor center and leads up to Makahiku Falls (0.5 miles) and Waimoku Falls (2 miles). To see both falls, allow about two hours return. 

Along the path you’ll pass large mango trees and patches of guava before coming to an overlook after about 10 minutes. Makahiku Falls, a long bridal-veil waterfall that drops into a deep gorge, is just off to the right. Thick green ferns cover the sides of 200-foot basalt cliffs where the water cascades – a rewarding scene for such a short walk.

Continuing along the main trail, you’ll walk beneath old banyan trees, cross Palikea Stream (bug spray advisable here) and enter the wonderland of the Bamboo Forest, where thick groves of bamboo bang together musically in the wind.

The upper section is muddy, but boardwalks cover most of the mud. Beyond the bamboo forest is Waimoku Falls, a thin, lacy 400-foot waterfall dropping down a sheer rock face. When you come out of the first grove you’ll see the waterfall in the distance. Forget swimming under Waimoku Falls – its pool is shallow and there’s a danger of falling rocks.

Tip for hiking the Pipiwai Trail: The trail can be muddy, so make sure you have the right gear. Wear grippy water shoes for this one.

Woman hiking, Waihe'e, Maui, Hawaii
Waihe’e Ridge Trail offers lush views of Waihe’e Gorge © darekm101 / Getty Images

Waiheʻe Ridge Trail

Best hike for variety

5 miles roundtrip, 3 hours, moderate

For jaw-dropping views over the long, lush carpets of Waihe’e Gorge, cascading waterfalls, tropical forests and a bird’s eye view of Wailuku and Maui’s wild northern coast, it doesn’t get much better than the Waihe’e Ridge Trail.

To get to the trailhead, take the one-lane paved road that starts on the inland side of the Kahekili Hwy just south of the 7-mile marker in Maui. You’ll find parking before the trailhead (currently open 7am to 7pm). Begin your walk by climbing a sheer concrete ramp, and pass blue water tanks on the right.

Suitable for solo walkers, fit seniors and active kids, the initial path is a bit steep and can get swampy – Waihe‘e means “slippery water” in Hawaiian, but don’t let this dishearten you. It’s a fairly steady climb to the 2563-foot summit of Lanilili Peak, but it’s not a strenuous one.

Be prepared to walk back down the mountain afterwards. There are intervals of flat terrain throughout the trail. It’s best to bring good walking shoes to tackle mud, stones and exposed tree roots. Set off before 8am to beat the heat and the clouds, which can obscure the view later in the morning. Perhaps grab one of the walking sticks/tree branches, often left behind by hikers, at the gate leading onto the trail, if you are in need of some extra support.

Starting at an elevation of 1000 feet, it’s already possible to spy the vast blue ocean. The trail, which crosses reserve land, climbs a ridge, passing from mainly shaded humid woodland areas of ancient undergrowth to open pastures nearer the summit.

Guava trees and groves of eucalyptus are prominent, and the aroma of fallen fruit may accompany you after a rainstorm. From the 0.75-mile post, panoramic views open up, with a scene that sweeps clear down to the ocean along the Waiheʻe Gorge and deep into pleated valleys.

Continuing on, you’ll enter ‘ohi‘a forest; look out for butterflies and native birds like the bright crimson ʻapapane. A clearing offers a bench in prime view of the cascading Makamaka‘ole Falls in the distance. On the ridge, views are similar to those you’d see from a helicopter, and you’ll probably see a handful of them dart into the adjacent valley like gnats on a mission.

There are several natural pausing places along the trail to stop and soak up the scenery and remarkable stillness. Birdsong, chirping insects, a rushing stream, muffled bits of hiker conversation below – these are the only interruptions. The trail ends with a series of sharp bends and a steep climb to a picnic table on the 2563-foot peak of Lanilili. You’ll be rewarded with a staggering 360-degree view, and with clear skies it’s possible to see Haleakalā volcano in the distance. If it’s foggy, wait about 10 minutes or so; it may blow off.

The Division of Forestry and Wildlife claims 50 to 100 people hike the trail daily, so expect company

Two men looking at Hanakapi'ai Beach on the Na Pali Coast of Kauai
It takes most hikers about 2 hours to complete the trek to Hanakapi’ai Beach © Alexander Howard / Lonely Planet

Kalalau Trail/Keʻe Beach to Hanakapiʻai Beach

Best hike for panoramic views

4 miles roundtrip, 4 hours, moderate to difficult

The Kalalau Trail begins with a steep uphill ascent from its Ke‘e Beach trailhead. For the first half-mile much of the path is cobbled, but it’s still quite a climb. Fortunately it’s also beautiful, with lush tropical vegetation and superb views.

A mile along, at the highest point on this stretch – 400 feet above the ocean – vast panoramas open up ahead, looking westward along the coast. The trail then winds through successive hanging valleys, crossing trickling cascades at each inland curve before veering back out to the next headland.

It takes most hikers approaching two hours to complete the 2-mile trek to Hanakapi‘ai Beach. As the trail drops back down to the sea, you have to cross broad Hanakapi‘ai Stream; a helpful rope is often strung between the banks. The white-sand beach at the river mouth is constantly re-configured by the waves and may take the form of a sandbar, cut off beyond a small lagoon. Be warned, though: numerous hikers have drowned here, and it’s never safe for swimming.

An overhead view of Waipo'o Falls in Kaua'i, Hawaii
Waipoo Falls in Waimea Canyon offers some of the best family hiking © Matt Munro / Lonely Planet

Cliff & Canyon Trails

Best hike for canyon views

3.6 miles roundtrip, 1 hour and 30 min, moderate

For some of the best family hiking in Kauaʻi ‘s Kokeʻe State Park, set off along the straightforward 0.1-mile Cliff Trail, which starts 0.8 miles down Halemanu Rd. Enjoy the canyon views, then keep going on the forested, 1.7-mile Canyon Trail, which descends steeply before reaching a vast red-dirt promontory, poised above stark cliffs. Just beyond, some huff-and-puff climbing brings you to Waipoʻo Falls.

If you’ve had enough, turn around at the falls. Otherwise, follow the trail across the stream to the canyon rim. It ends at Kumuwela Lookout, where you can rest at a picnic table before backtracking to Halemanu Rd.

For an alternate return route, make a right at the signed intersection with the Black Pipe Trail at the top of the switchback where you leave the canyon rim. This half-mile route ends at the 4WD road, where you turn left (downhill) and walk back to where you started.

If you have a 4WD, you can skip the steep trek by accessing the trail system from the end of Kumuwela Ridge.

A woman stands at the end of the Awa'awapuhi Trail on Kauai, Hawaii
Awa’awapuhi trail on Kauai is moderate six-mile trail © Chase Clausen/Shutterstock

Awaʻawapuhi Trail

Best hike in Kikeʻe

6.2 miles roundtrip, 4-5 hours, moderate

Arguably the best trail in Kokeʻe, measuring 3.1 miles one way, the Awaʻawapuhi Trail culminates in unsurpassable vistas from the Awaʻawapuhi Lookout, 2500 feet above the Na Pali coast. While demanding considerable stamina, it’s less steep or technical than the Nuʻalolo Trail nearby, and makes a better fit for families. It starts alongside Kokeʻe Rd, 1.7 miles uphill beyond the lodge.

A warning sign to beachgoers at Hanakapi'ai Beach on the Na Pali Coast in Kauai
While hiking in Hawaii offers beautiful sights and adventures, beware of weather conditions and dangerous waves © Alexander Howard / Lonely Planet

Tips for hiking in Hawaii

A hat, sunscreen and lots of water are always mandatory. Coastal trails can bake you to a crisp and cause heat exhaustion or life-threatening heat stroke, especially when walking across sun-reflective lava.

If you’re looking to spend hours (or days) on the trail, bring hiking boots and rainproof clothing – weather is changeable, and trails can be rocky, uneven and muddy.

If you’ll be tackling a mountain summit, carry a fleece or down jacket (even in summer).

Always bring a flashlight. It gets dark fast after sunset, and trails can take longer than expected to finish due to the uneven terrain or accidentally getting lost.

All freshwater – whether flowing or from a pond – must be treated before drinking to avoid giardiasis and leptospirosis

Depending on the hike, potential environmental hazards range from vog to flash floods and waterfalls, which are not always safe for swimming.

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