Dr. Fauci Warns “Don’t” Do This Before or After COVID Vaccine


“Impending doom” are the words the CDC director used this week, as the coronavirus pandemic continues. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meant that cases are plateauing, and rising in some states, so now is not the time to be complacent. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the President and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, was asked today on CBS This Morning what he thought of those words. Read on to hear his own warning—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Signs Your Illness is Actually Coronavirus in Disguise.

“Please Be Careful,” Warns Dr. Fauci. “Don’t Declare Victory Prematurely.”

“Baseball’s opening day, which happens to be today. Spring break is also going on at the moment. A lot of people are going to be gathering Sunday for Easter. You put that all together, Dr. Fauci—I’m curious, we heard the CDC director talk of impending doom as people loosen up and gather, do you share her concerns?” asked the CBS hosts.

“Well, you know, I don’t know if I would use the word ‘impending doom,’” said Dr. Fauci. “If you talk to Dr. Walensky, which we do every single day, the point she’s making is a very valid point. We’re seeing the cases that have plateaued over the last couple of weeks, and now they’re starting to inch up. So the point that she was making was very valid. Please be careful. Don’t declare victory prematurely. Let’s continue to abide by the public health measures that we all talk about because we have so much in our favor—what we have is we have 3 million people that are getting vaccinated every single day. We have over 50 million people who have been completely and fully vaccinated, others that have at least one dose of vaccine. So every day that goes by, we get more and more protected. So what I say, and what Dr. Wallensky is saying is, just hold on for a bit longer, because every day is more and more in our favor and don’t pull back prematurely. We are going to be able to pull back. We didn’t want people to believe that we’re going to be in this situation forever. We’re not, but don’t pull back prematurely.”

RELATED: Most COVID Patients Did This Before Getting Sick

How to Stay Safe During This Pandemic

So follow Fauci’s fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don’t travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don’t go indoors with people you’re not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don’t visit any of these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.



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Dr. Fauci Says You No Longer Have to Do This Anymore


At the start of the pandemic, health experts were still in the process of learning about COVID-19, including the most common methods of transmission, who is considered high risk, and even how to treat those infected with the virus. One year later, the virus is more thoroughly understood, and therefore, many of the recommendations offered then are no longer relevant. On Tuesday night Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the President and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, spoke at the National Congress of American Indians Executive Council and revealed one major rule that has changed. Read on to find out what it is—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus

Dr. Fauci Says No Need to Wash Cardboard—But Please Wash Your Hands After Handling It

Initially, health experts believed that COVID-19 could be spread via infected droplets landing on surfaces—such as countertops, plastic, metal, and even cardboard and paper. Therefore, they encouraged people to wipe down and sanitize surfaces regularly. Some people even avoided touching packages and mail for a few days. However, according to Dr. Fauci, there isn’t a need for this any more. “The overwhelming transmissibility occurs through droplets in the air and not on cardboard boxes that get sent anywhere to you,” he confirmed. 

While you may be safe touching these items, hand hygiene is still important. “The best way to avoid any problem is to wash your hands as frequently as you can. And it could be cold water. It doesn’t have to be warm water. And even if you don’t have the availability nearby of water, then try to get, and I don’t know how easy that would be for you to try to get some of these alcohol sanitizers and put them in appropriate places where people can just quickly give a spurt like that go like that. And if you don’t have accessibility of water nearby something as easy as that, will get your hands sanitized appropriately.”

Earlier this year the FDA also confirmed that the virus isn’t usually spread this way. “The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to underscore that there is no credible evidence of food or food packaging associated with or as a likely source of viral transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus causing COVID-19,” said Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of food and drugs at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

RELATED: If You Feel This You May Have Already Had COVID Says Dr. Fauci

How to Stay Safe During This Pandemic

Follow Fauci’s fundamentals and help end this surge, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don’t travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don’t go indoors with people you’re not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don’t visit any of these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.



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Fauci warns Thanksgiving travel could make current Covid surge worse


WASHINGTON — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s leading infectious disease expert, warned that the travel-heavy Thanksgiving holiday could make the current surge in Covid-19 cases even worse as the nation heads into December.

Appearing on NBC News’ “Meet the Press” Sunday, Fauci said that public health officials “tried to get the word out for people, as difficult as it is, to really not have large gatherings” during the holiday due to concerns that the celebrations could exacerbate the coronavirus spread.

“What we expect, unfortunately, as we go for the next couple of weeks into December, is that we might see a surge superimposed on the surge we are already in,” he said.

“I don’t want to frighten people except to say it’s not too late at all for us to do something about this,” he added, urging Americans to be careful when they travel back home and upon arriving, and to take proven steps like social distancing and wearing masks.

It can sometimes take two weeks for infected people to develop symptoms, and asymptomatic people can spread the virus without knowing they have it. So Fauci said the “dynamics of an outbreak” show a three-to-five-week lag between serious mitigation efforts and the actual curbing of infection rates.

While the first wave of vaccinations could start in America within a matter of weeks, Fauci said that, for now, “we are going to have to make decisions as a nation, state, city and family that we are in a very difficult time, and we’re going to have to do the kinds of restrictions of things we would have liked to have done, particularly in this holiday season, because we’re entering into what’s really a precarious situation.”

Covid-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. have been accelerating in recent weeks. There have been more than 4 million cases and 35,000 deaths attributed to the virus in the month of November alone. Overall, America has had 13.3 million coronavirus cases and 267,000 deaths attributable to the virus, according to an NBC News analysis.

Despite a mid-November warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encouraging Americans not to travel during Thanksgiving, air travel broke pandemic records, with 6.8 million people traveling through airports in the seven days ahead of the holiday.

The already accelerating caseload, combined with the potential for another surge of cases, comes as hospitals across the country are sounding the alarm about overloading the system’s capacity.

Fauci said that he is concerned about the nation’s hospitals, noting that he received calls last night from colleagues across the country “pleading for advice” amid the “significant stresses on the hospital and health care delivery systems.”

While he explicitly said he was not calling for a national lockdown, Fauci said at the local level, Americans could “blunt” the surge’s effects on the hospital system by taking mitigation steps “short of locking down so we don’t precipitate the necessity of locking down.”

The surge in cases comes amid promising news about a coronavirus vaccine, with both public health officials and the federal government planning to begin the first wave of vaccinations in December. Fauci said that while the “exact” recommendations for scheduling groups to receive vaccinations have not been finalized, “health care workers are going to be among” those first in line for the vaccines.

He pointed to the country’s success in distributing annual flu vaccines as “the reason we should feel more confident” about the ability to send the needed vaccine across America.

“The part about 300 million doses getting shipped is going to get taken care of by people who know how to do that,” he said. “The part at the distal end, namely, getting it into people’s arms, is going to be more challenging than a regular flu season, it would be foolish to deny that. But I think it’s going to be able to get done because the local people have done that in the past. Hopefully, they’ll get the resources to help them to do that.”



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